Today is World Radio Day



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Ghana has joined the world to mark the World Radio Day which falls on today, January 13th, 2020.

The World Radio Day is a time to celebrate radio as a medium for communication for development and radio as a versatile communication tool that has endured the test time all over the world.

Proclaimed in 2011 by the Member States of UNESCO, and adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 2012 as an International Day, February 13 became World Radio Day (WRD).

Radio is a powerful medium for celebrating humanity in all its diversity and constitutes a platform for democratic discourse. At the global level, radio remains the most widely consumed medium.

This unique ability to reach out the widest audience means radio can shape a society’s experience of diversity, stand as an arena for all voices to speak out, be represented and heard.

As part of activities to mark the World Radio Day 2020, some radio stations have shared their concerns, sentiments and as well appreciated the importance of radio to humans.

In a press statement by the Farm Radio International, in collaboration with UNESCO, the Country Director of Farm Radio International, Mr Benjamin Kojo Fiafor who observed the importance of radio noted that Ghana alone is home for more than 450 radio stations.

Despite having more than 450 radio stations, he questioned how diverse these stations are, how many of them are public, private and community owned.

“The sheer number of radio stations may suggest how Ghanaians have embraced radio since air waves were liberalised in 1996. But one may ask who are the owners of these radio stations and how many women own radio stations in Ghana?” he quizzed.

Touching on issues of frequencies, Mr Benjamin Kojo Fiafor noticed that commercial radio stations have taken a good part of our airwaves with content skewed largely to party politics, sports and entertainment at the expense of well-produced educative and informative programs.

“Even applicants for community radio frequencies quickly operate as commercial stations. This negates the very characteristics of a community radio. Owners and managers of radio stations should also ensure inclusion and fair representation on programs by including the youth, minority, women, and physically challenged,” he said.

Mr Benjamin Kojo Fiafor therefore called on government to endeavour to release more frequencies to community radio stations and protect the development of community radio stations in Ghana.

“This year being an election year, all must endeavour to use radio responsibly by encouraging people and teams with diverse skills, experiences, knowledge, orientation to work, produce or to contribute to radio programs as a requirement for diversity in radio. We wish all owners, broadcasters and workers of radio stations “Ayeko” and “Happy World Radio Day,” he said.

Below is a statement:

 

@DAYRADIO FARM RADIO PRESS RELEASE For Immediate Release Accra, Ghana – February 13th, 2020 – World Radio Day 2020 — Diversity in the use of Radio! World Radio Day is a time to celebrate radio as a medium for communication for development and radio as a versatile communication tool that has endured the test time all over the world. Just imagine how our world would be without Radio. Radio can be found almost everywhere, on mobile phones, computers, homes, cars and all public places. Maybe that is why most of us have taken radio for granted. A cursory look at the themes for this years celebration may shed more light on how positively or otherwise we in Ghana are doing on the scorecard. Ghana is home to more than 450 radio stations but how diverse are these stations and how many of them are public, private and community owned? The sheer number of radio stations may suggest how Ghanaians have embraced radio since air waves were liberalised in 1996. But one may ask who are the owners of these radio stations and how many women own radio stations in Ghana? About the issues of Frequencies, can we ask ourselves whether we have a good mix of public, private and community radios? It appears commercial radio stations have taken a good part of our airwaves and content skewed largely to party politics, sports and entenainment at the expense of well-produced educative and informative programs. Even applicants for community radio frequencies quickly operate as commercial stations. This negates the very characteristics of a community radio. Owners and managers of radio stations should also ensure inclusion and fair representation on programs by including the youth, minority, women, and physically challenged. Govemment must endeavour to release more frequencies to community radio stations and protect the development of community radio stations in Ghana. This year being an election year, all must endeavour to use radio responsibly by encouraging people and teams with diverse skills, experiences, knowledge, orientation to work, produce or to contribute to radio programs as a requirement for diversity in radio. We wish all owners, broadcasters and workers of radio stations “Ayeko” and “Happy World Radio Day”. Thursday February 13 th, 2020 is the ninth annual World Radio Day. In celebrating the event in Ghana, Farm Radio International (FRI), in partnership with the UNESCO Office in Accra, the Ministry of Information, and other media partners are commemorating this special day at Kofi Annan Center of Excellence in Accra from 9 AM to 3 PM. Ail are cordially invited. Thank you Country Director Farm Radio International (020 818 6887) Website: www.farmradio.org, Email: office@farmradiogh.org

Ghana| Atinkaonline.com| Porcia Oforiwaa Ofori